Room with a view

Room with a view

Room with a view

2005
utility building, cinderblocks, DVD projection with sound
259×342×705 cm

Room with a view Room with a view

Room with a View provides the viewer with a conundrum of walls and windows; logical and illogical partitions that alternately close off and open up different perspectives. One sees a real window alongside one that is virtual; a real building enveloped by one that is a farce.

A free standing, utility building rests upon a stretch of beach. It has a white colour, with a separate, cinder block wall extending out from one of its side’s. The cinder block wall forms a cramped quadrilateral that folds back alongside the utility building at an acute, hugging angle, echoing its basic form and dimensions. Sections of the cinder block wall have been left open, suggesting incomplete windows.

Inside the utility building, an inner extension of the cinder block wall reveals itself. This partially built wall dissects the building’s interior in two sections, while providing an oblique continuation of its outer design. Within the blocked-off space of the room, a video is projected on the wall at the exact height of an adjacent window to be found on the blocks’ other side. Both “views” depict tropical scenery consisting of beaches, waves, palm trees and rocky coastal bays. Though as the video plays a montage of tall palm trees turning counter-clockwise within the frame, its sound is suddenly muted. During this vacuumed scene the camera is tilted 360° in following the retrograde progression of the treetops. A subtle sense of counter-resistance is conveyed through the cameras attempts to “catch” or “set strait” the revolution of the trees. The result is a helpless, dizzying contrast from the otherwise peaceful nature of the video and the real scenes occurring outside the building’s window.

Room with a View provides the viewer with a conundrum of walls and windows; logical and illogical partitions that alternately close off and open up different perspectives. One sees a real window alongside one that is virtual; a real building enveloped by one that is a farce. Amid the series of cramped, trace-shifted corners one senses not only the overlapping of physical properties, but also a mental inter-phase, where selective impressions and memories skim the fringes of reality.

The would-be world of thoughts and dreams imposes itself upon the rigid, inflexible conditions of reality, jousting for its place among the actual. When compromised by plausibility, our wishes turn inward, constructing their own areas, forged into shape by the raw materials of the imagination.